The posts on this page are from a variety of Salem blogs and the views expressed are those of the individual blog author.

May 31st, 2013

Salem’s Quakers and Their Lost Memorial

The artist's rendition of the proposed Quaker Pesecution Monument offered to the City of Salem in 1904

Having come from what they considered an oppressive society, the Puritans were determined to follow their own ways, especially regarding religion.

While they had been persecuted for their beliefs in England, this did not generate toleration in them. Once settled in the new world, they set about building a society that mirrored their beliefs.

Knowing that the devil was about, they enacted strict laws. There was not separation of church and state when building a new Jerusalem. When settlers strayed from the accepted norms or failed to attend church meetings, they were fined and or punished. With such a theocracy, there was little room for dissent and no room for other belief systems. When Roger Williams advanced a new perspective, he escaped the colony, rather than face arrest and trial for heresy with its severe penalties.  

Into this rigid atmosphere a new threat appeared in the form of the Society of Friends, who were derisively named Quakers, since they “trembled in the way of the Lord” at the private communications they received from God. The Friends embraced the term and were soon referred to as Quakers. Founded by George Fox, they believed in individual revelation and, since life is a sacrament, there is no need for special sacraments; there was no need for ministers since the priesthood was of all believers.

They refused to pay tithes to the state church, refused to take oaths of allegiance, and refused to serve in combat. They also espoused equality among their members, giving women a much larger role than ever before. These early Quakers, who were seen as a threat to established religion, were confrontational when it came to pointing out the errors of  other religions. Because of their beliefs, the Quakers were persecuted in Europe. Considered heretics, they were arrested, fined, imprisoned and seen as possible witches with their devilish religion.

Puritan Salem heard about this new sect and were very wary of any Quaker immigrants. In 1656, when two Quakers were found on a ship landing in Salem, the town fathers had them inspected for witch marks. Not finding any, which would have been a death sentence, they were put back on the ship and deported. In the same year the government of Massachusetts passed a law fining any captain who brought Quakers to the colony.

The Quakers, however with missionary zeal were not to be denied, and persisted in coming to Massachusetts. Some who had been whipped and banished from the colony continued to return, feeling a zealous obligation to bear witness to their truth. These Quakers managed to convert some pilgrims to their cause. Those converts also risked punishment, fines and banishment.

One Salem family, Lawrence and Cassandra Southwick and their children, were singled out for extremely harsh treatment. They had immigrated to Salem with four of their six children in 1637. Lawrence was perhaps the first glassmaker in America and set up his works in what became known as the Glass House Field in the present day Aborn Street area.

The Southwicks converted to the Society of Friends and hosted two Quaker preachers in their home in 1657. They were promptly arrested for this crime and jailed. Lawrence, since he was still a member of First Church, was released, while his wife remained jailed for seven weeks and was whipped and fined 40 shillings for having a document written by the Quaker missionaries. 40 shillings was a substantial fine for the day.

Realizing that the 1656 law was not slowing the arrival of Quakers, the legislature passed a new law calling for cutting off an ear, branding, and boring a hole in the tongue for returning after banishment, in addition to fines, whipping and banishment. This too did not stem the flow of missionaries who were making converts in the colony. The legislature, fed up with the banished returning to witness to these unjust laws, added a death sentence to those returning after banishment. This lead to four executions on Boston Common. King Charles II eventually intervened in 1661 and ordered the persecution of Quakers to end.

The Southwicks and their son, Joshua were again arrested in 1658 for being Quakers and not attending proper church services. They were imprisoned for twenty weeks and fined. Unable to pay the fines, some of their property was seized and sold, reducing them to dire circumstances.

In 1659, two of their children, a daughter, Provided, and son, Daniel, were ordered to be sold as slaves in Barbados to pay the fines. No merchant captain agreed to transport them, so they were allowed to stay until a captain willing to transport and sell them could be found. The poet John Greenleaf Whittier immortalized this confrontation in his poem, “Cassandra Southwick.”

While public sentiment was shifting in favor of leniency to the Quakers, the leaders refused to back down from this “threat.” Impoverished and banished, the Southwick family went to Shelter Island, New York in the winter of 1659-60. Reacting to this privation, both Cassandra and Lawrence died within days of each other.

The persistent persecution of the Southwicks is often cited as one of the worst cases of religious discrimination in Puritan Massachusetts. Here was an elderly couple, deprived of their freedom and estate, prosecuted retroactively by laws passed while they were imprisoned, banished, penniless in the dead of winter, which caused their deaths. This case is most notable in that they were not zealous missionaries, but residents who chose to follow a new path.

With the end of discrimination, the Quakers settled throughout the colonies and became integral members of society, producing leaders in a number of fields, both in Salem and throughout the country. Among the many descendants of the Salem Southwicks were Winston Churchill, Richard Nixon, and Lyndon LaRouche.

In 1904, Mr. Ayer, a descendant of the Southwicks,  commissioned J. Massey Rhind, a well known sculptor, to design a suitable memorial to the Southwicks and the persecuted quakers for presentation to the City of Salem. 

Upon completion of the design in 1904, he offered the memorial for placement on some public space in the City. This offer generated much controversy over a couple of years, culminating in the City’s refusal of the gift.

The main point of contention was the monument’s design. The design showed a man and a woman being attacked by a tiger (see above drawing). The City Council, in debating this, felt it equated Salem’s Pilgrim fathers, most notably, Governor Endicott, with a vicious beast. The donor stated in a letter to the city that the design would not be altered. This was followed up in a meeting with the sculptor in 1906, who also stated that no modifications would be considered. The controversy over the statue raged for almost two years and ended with a January 1907 committee report of the mayor and five alderman recommending refusal, with one alderman dissenting. The ten page report justifies refusal by citing a number of glowing tributes to the founders who, while they made errors, also did much good.

The report concludes, “It is unfilial, it is unfair, it is untrue, for us, the successors of these men, to erect upon the very ground which they consecrated to public use forever, a rampant tiger as representing the predominant surviving traits of their character.”

The monument was never completed. In 1959 a bronze statute to Mary Dyer, one of the Quakers hanged on Boston Common, was erected outside the doors of the Massachusetts State House as a monument to the Boston Quaker Martyrs.

There is no monument commemorating the nonviolent witness of Salem Quakers who endeared the harshest discrimination for several years. 

May 21st, 2013

Salem High School Chef Aiming for ‘Cake War’ Win

Catherine Kinsella of Salem.

A Salem High School senior is one of five local seniors hoping to win Cakes for Occasion’s “Cake Wars.”

Catherine Kinsella is taking her cake creation up against Jamie Tarricone of Danvers High School, Ari Cipriani of Masconomet Regional High School, Kimberly Sousa of Peabody Veterans Memorial High School and Tess Greenberg of Beverly High School. 

The winner will get a college scholarship and win dessert their Senior Class Up All Night event.

Voting runs through Thursday at 3 p.m. on Cakes for Occassion’s Facebook page. The cake with the most votes will win.

The cakes were created at Cakes for Ocassions, on Maple Street in Danvers Square, in a three hour span. Family members and friends looked on as the senior decorated the cakes and the cakes were then tasted afterward from tables along the sidewalk, each decorated the with school colors.

May 17th, 2013

Live Music This Weekend: Black Dog Brother at the Gulu

Here is a round-up of live music throughout the North Shore this weekend.

This weekend is packed with live music on the North Shore and a whole bunch of bands playing a wide variety of music genres, from classic rock to blues and soul, can be seen for free at rock clubs and restaurants throughout the region. 

The Guy Ford Band is playing the Red Rock Bistro on Friday night. This local group consists of a “five piece eclectic acoustic folk rock band featuring Guy Ford’s unique guitar work and the incredible cello playing of Daniel Rowe with strong 3-4 part harmonies. Guy Ford Band performs covers from the 60’s – 2000’s and originals since 1997,” per the Guy Ford Band Facebook page. 

All shows begin at 9 p.m. unless specified.

Other Live Music This Weekend:

Rockafellas, 231 Essex Street, Salem

Fri., May 17 – Lisa Love Experience
Sat., May 18 – Midnight Goggles

Gulu-Gulu Cafe, 247 Essex St, Salem

Fri., May 17 – Mark T. Small
Sat., May 18 – Black Dog Brother

Howling Wolf, 76 Lafayette Street, Salem

Fri., May 17 – Jeff Buckridge/Megan McKenzie Duo
Sat., May 18 –Joe LaRue Smith

Red Rock Bistro & Bar, 141 Humphrey Street, Swampscott

Fri., May 17 – Guy Ford Band
Sat., May 18 – Erin Harpe & the Delta Blue Swingers 

Stonewood Tavern, Newhall Plaza, 139 Lynnfield St., Suite 200, Peabody

Fri., May 17 – 
Sat., May 18 – Britannica Duo

Capone’s Restaurant & Bar, 147 Summit St, Peabody

Fri., May 17 – Wildfire
Sat., May 18 – Groove Alliance

Chianti’s Tuscan Restaurant & Jazz Lounge, 285 Cabot St., Beverly

Fri., May 17 –  MetroWest Thump
Sat., May 18 – Jeremy Parker Quintet

The Landing Restaurant, 81 Front St., Marblehead

Fri., May 17 – Code 51
Sat., May 18 – Plan B

Me and Thee Coffee House, 28 Mugford St., Marblehead

Fri., May 17 – Ryan Montbleau · Tall Heights open

Sat., May 18 –

Palmer’s Restaurant & Tavern, 18 Elm St., Andover

Fri., May 17 – White Lightnin Band
Sat., May 18 – Hal Holiday and the No Tones

Andolini’s Italian Restaurant, 19 Essex St., Andover

Fri., May 17 – N/A
Sat., May 18 – Doug Kwartler

May 10th, 2013

Live Music This Weekend: Drop Zone at Rockafellas

Here is a round-up of live music throughout the North Shore this weekend.

This weekend is packed with live music on the North Shore and a whole bunch of bands playing a wide variety of music genres, from classic rock to blues and soul, can be seen for free at rock clubs and restaurants throughout the region. 

The Drop Zone is playing at Rockafellas on Saturday night. Per the band’s wesbite, the Drop Zone “is a full production rock/pop/dance cover band. Drop Zone is a top-notch act covering everything from The Bravery to Bob Marley, Rage Against The Machine to The Killers and The Rolling Stones to Katy Perry. The main idea for the song selection is to give the people what they want, and more specifically, what they want to dance to.”

All shows begin at 9 p.m. unless specified.

Other Live Music This Weekend:

Rockafellas, 231 Essex Street, Salem

Fri., May 10 – The Pop Disaster
Sat., May 11 – The Drop Zone

Gulu-Gulu Cafe, 247 Essex St, Salem

Fri., May 10 – As the Sparrow
Sat., May 11 – The Found Objects

Howling Wolf, 76 Lafayette Street, Salem

Fri., May 10 – Nick Consone
Sat., May 11 – Lois Lane and the Daily Planets

Chianti’s Tuscan Restaurant & Jazz Lounge, 285 Cabot St., Beverly

Fri., May 10 – Eric Goldberg Trio
Sat., May 11 – Michelle Willson

Red Rock Bistro & Bar, 141 Humphrey Street, Swampscott

Fri., May 10 – Brian Maes Band
Sat., May 11 – Kevin Norris Band

Stonewood Tavern, Newhall Plaza, 139 Lynnfield St., Suite 200, Peabody

Fri., May 10 – Cool Change
Sat., May 11 – Grupo Fantasia

Capone’s Restaurant & Bar, 147 Summit St, Peabody

Fri., May 10 – Ript
Sat., May 11 – Hooda Thunk

The Landing Restaurant, 81 Front St., Marblehead

Fri., May 10 – Release the Hounds
Sat., May 11 – Yukon Cornelius

Me and Thee Coffee House, 28 Mugford St., Marblehead

Fri., May 10 – Zoë Lewis · Bethel Steele opens

Palmer’s Restaurant & Tavern, 18 Elm St., Andover

Fri., May 10 – Bruce Marshall Band
Sat., May 11 – Jah Spirit Band

Andolini’s Italian Restaurant, 19 Essex St., Andover

Fri., May 10 – Ashley Dawn
Sat., May 11 –Doug Kwartler

May 6th, 2013

Thousands Flock to Angie Miller Concert

May 5th, 2013

Idol Angie Miller Sings Favorite Songs

May 5th, 2013

Young Angie Fans Show Their Support

Olivia DiPierro, 13, of Salem talks about why she likes American Idol Angie Miller of Beverly.

Angie Miller fans packed the parade route through downtown Beverly on Saturday afternoon, especially packing in between City Hall and Dane Street and in the Gloucester Crossing area.

Miller rode on the back of a Ford convertible – a major American Idol sponsor- from City Hall to Beverly High School. Leading Miller was the Beverly High School band and Junior ROTC plus a trolley full of city leaders and other dignitaries.

Many of the fans were from Beverly but many others came from all over the North Shore. Some brought homemade signs showing support for Miller, including Peabody and one from New Hampshire.

See the attached videos to hear from some of Miller’s young fans and they waited along the parade route.

For all of our coverage of Angie Miller’s dream journey, visit our Angie Miller topic page.

April 27th, 2013

History Behind Salem’s Senior Center on the Common

THe Salem Classical High School as it looked in the 1880's

I was recently asked the question about the history of 5 Broad Street.

Now that the green light has been given to a new senior center, it seems this would be a good time to review the history of 5 Broad St. as it enters a period of change.

Before this area became an enclave of educational buildings in the mid 1800s, there was already significant history here. This area was the site of Salem Common for many years before the Common on Washington Square.

In the 1600s and 1700s the current Common on Washington Square was a combination of marshland with streams and hillocks along with scrubland, surrounded by ropewalks and tanneries leading to Collins (Shallops) Cove. In those days, the cove reached further inland to a dock on what is now Essex Street.

This common area was used by the residents for grazing livestock and timber. It was also used as a drill field for the Salem Militia but apart from a small field bordering a house, it was woefully inadequate as a training ground even though it had been designated as such.

During this period in Salem’s history, the town considered the Common to be the land along Broad Street bordering the cemetery. In those times it was ordinary practice to utilize public land for a number of purposes, in addition to it being the Town’s Common where residents would gather.  When the early residents wanted to care for the poor and build an almshouse, they decided to build it on the common. In 1719 they built an Almshouse on the northeasterly corner of the Broad Street Cemetery, known as Pickering’s Hill. Also here was the hay market and the public scales used for sales.

The Almshouse / Workhouse was rebuilt in 1770. In 1790 it was enlarged, but of poor design due to the independent additions that hampered access to the whole building.

When the need arose to clean the North River and harbor channels of debris, the selectmen offered land on this common for rent, showing us another use for the Common.  After years of bickering, a new almshouse was built on Salem Neck and opened in 1816. The Almshouse on Broad St. was then sold at auction for its material.

This willingness to use this Common to save paying for land or to generate income would not have been possible without Elias Derby. When Elias Derby was named Colonel of the Salem Militia in 1800, he set about fixing the training field which is now the current common area. From subscriptions, he was able to raise sufficient money to level the grounds, fill in the ponds and streams and configure the Common as it is today. Having this newly laid out central place that was fast becoming a fashionable area to build  mansions, the old Common on Broad Street was looked upon as town land available for new purposes. In addition to the Alms house, Salem Classical High School was built here in 1818. Nearby was the Registry of Deeds building designed by Samuel McIntyre and built there in late 18th century.

In 1854 the Commonwealth agreed to build a State Normal School in Salem, provided that the city agreed to pay for theland and building, then be reimbursed. City officials chose to demolish the registry of deeds and build next to the high school. When there was a need for a new high school they chose to build next to the existing high school and made the former Classical High School the Oliver Grammar school.

The new Classical High School at 5 Broad Street was built in the similar Italianate design of the Normal school by the well known local architect Enoch Fuller and opened in 1855.  

The former Common now housed  three schools for the city and became an educational center. Over the next decades, renovations and expansions were made to these buildings reflecting the growth of the City. In 1897 the City acquired the State Normal School when the school moved to Loring Avenue. That building was then used as another city high school.

#5 Broad Street functioned as the Classical High School until 1908 when the new, much larger high school was built on Highland Avenue.  After a few years of use as the  high school annex, a modified milk station was placed here by the City. In those days, cities and towns had the duty of  issuing permits and inspecting milk both certified, and modified, (fat free). This was an important public health issue especially regarding infant mortality rates which were elevated by dirty and impure milk.

It appears that the school, in addition to housing the milk station, also served as an industrial school for the city. It also housed evening schools which were very popular with working people. This usage continued up to the mid 1950s. While being used for vocational training, part of the building housed a Dental Clinic run by the Board of Health throughout the 1930s.

After almost a century as a school, in 1955 it appears on City rolls as vacant. In 1956 the Health Department was the first of several city departments to move into the building.  Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, in addition to the Health Dept., there were several organizations such as district nurses, the North Shore Committee on Alcoholism, United Cerebral Palsy Association and the Friends Society. In 1975 it appears city depts. had taken over the building . Here was housed the Board of Appeals, the City Recreation Dept., City Inspectors and Property Depts. Also here was Elder Affairs.

After sitting vacant in early 1976, the building re-opened as the Salem Senior Citizen Center at a time when senior centers were appearing across the commonwealth. Through a series of grants and public funding, the building was refurbished to provide a variety of services for elder residents.

From that time forward the building has been dedicated to senior issues while still housing the City Recreation Department and Veteran’s Affairs.

While the years have not been gentle to the building it remains a testament to Salem’s educational history. This building marked a turning point for the City. Rather than have separate schools for boys and girls, schools focused on college preparatory and non-college bound, this high school marked a consolidation of these schools into one where curriculums were more flexible, giving students new opportunities across disciplines. One could argue that this school marks the beginning of the current secondary school approach to education.

From an architectural viewpoint, this building, even after some alterations over the years, retains its distinctive Italianate design that was prevalent in public buildings in the years before the Civil war.

The question for current Salemites is when the senior center moves from here, what should become of this property?

Should it go the route of the other buildings on this street and be converted to housing, either public or private?

Should it be converted back to office space for the city, perhaps vacating the need to rent additional space for city departments?

Given the statements about its inappropriateness as a senior center and general poor repair, will that continue with calls for its demolition?

It’s not too early to consider the future for this historic building.

April 26th, 2013

Live Music This Weekend: Mugsy and Dr. DK

Here is a round-up of live music throughout the North Shore this weekend.

This weekend is packed with live music on the North Shore and a whole bunch of bands playing a wide variety of music genres, from classic rock to blues and soul, can be seen for free at rock clubs and restaurants throughout the region. 

All shows begin at 9 p.m. unless specified.

Other Live Music This Weekend:

Rockafellas, 231 Essex Street, Salem

Fri., April 26 – Mugsy
Sat., April 27 – Live Radio

Gulu-Gulu Cafe, 247 Essex St, Salem

Fri., April 26 – Qwill
Sat., April 27 – Dr. DK

Howling Wolf, 76 Lafayette Street, Salem

Fri., April 26 – Erinn Brown
Sat., April 27 – Juliet Hawkins

Red Rock Bistro & Bar, 141 Humphrey Street, Swampscott

Fri., April 26 – Lois Lane and the Daily Planets
Sat., April 27 – Erin and the Soul Drivers

Stonewood Tavern, Newhall Plaza, 139 Lynnfield St., Suite 200, Peabody

Fri., April 26 – N/A
Sat., April 27 – Vinyl Groove

Capone’s Restaurant & Bar, 147 Summit St, Peabody

Fri., April 26 – Lisa Love
Sat., April 27 – Wild Fire

Chianti’s Tuscan Restaurant & Jazz Lounge, 285 Cabot St., Beverly

Fri., April 26 – HDRnB
Sat., April 27 – Benny Sharoni/George Garzone

The Landing Restaurant, 81 Front St., Marblehead

Fri., April 26 – Michael Troy
Sat., April 27 – Merj Music

Me and Thee Coffee House, 28 Mugford St., Marblehead

Fri., April 26 –The Stray Birds · Three Tall Pines

Palmer’s Restaurant & Tavern, 18 Elm St., Andover

Fri., April 26 – The Groove Band
Sat., April 27 – MSF Band

Andolini’s Italian Restaurant, 19 Essex St., Andover

Fri., April 26 – Doug Kwartler
Sat., April 27 – Ashley Dawn

April 18th, 2013

Rob Zombie’s ‘The Lords of Salem’ Makes East Coast Debut at CinemaSalem

It seems like ages ago when Rob Zombie’s crew was in the city shooting “The Lords of Salem.”

But the wait is over. The horror film made its East Coast debut Wednesday night at CinemaSalem. That’s well in advance of the film’s general release on Friday.

The film is set in present-day Salem, and you’ll see a lot of the city in the finished product. That is, if you don’t have your hands over your eyes the whole time.

Zombie has told interviewers that this film isn’t violent like his well-known butcher-fests “House of 1,000 Corpses” and “The Devil’s Rejects.” Instead this one offers psychological horror.

Zombie says reading a book about the witch trials was the impetus for the movie, but that it doesn’t aim at any kind of factual portrayal of history.

The plot involves a Salem DJ who unleashes an ancient curse. She might be going crazy or dark forces may be coming back to punish Salem for the events of 1692. “Possessing the souls of Salem women” apparently also comes into play. And if goat sacrifice offends you, you might want to see a different movie.

Some locations Zombie visited during his shoots included the Salem Willows Pier, Greenlawn Cemetery, the Essex Street Pedestrian Mall, the Witch Trials Memorial, Engine House Pizza and Essex Street by Hamilton Street.

The film debuted at the Toronto Film Festival back in September. Audiences at SXSW in Austin, Texas saw it in March. It opens to general release on Friday, including a run at Liberty Tree Mall in Danvers.

We’ve attached a YouTube trailer for the film.

We also have to give a hat tip to Salem Patch readers Sean Burque and Pamela Captain, who tipped us off that the sneak preview was happening at CinemaSalem.

Burque left this mini-review on our Facebook page: “Definitely lots of Salem, but to be honest, the movie was unbearably bad. And I am a HUGE fan of Rob Zombie’s other movies….So disappointed.”

Here at Salem Patch we’ve had fun following this project. Here are some of our previous stories about the film.

April 12th, 2013

Live Music This Weekend: Fighting Friday and Vein

This weekend is packed with live music on the North Shore and a whole bunch of bands playing a wide variety of music genres, from classic rock to blues and soul, can be seen for free at rock clubs and restaurants throughout the region.

The band 3 Vibe is playing at Chianti’s in Beverly on Friday night. Courtesy of Chianti’s website “this Gloucester-based group is an instrumental Funk/Jazz quartet playing original groove music. Highly danceable and intensely funky, 3VIBE’s influences include John Scofield, Medeski, Martin, and Wood, Lettuce, Soulive, and the Meters.”  

Other Live Music This Weekend:

All shows begin at 9 p.m. unless specified.

Rockafellas, 231 Essex Street, Salem

Fri., April 12 – Midnight Goggles
Sat., April 13 – Fighting Friday

Gulu-Gulu Cafe, 247 Essex St, Salem

Fri., April 12 – Melt – 7:30 p.m.
Sat., April 13 – Dan Blakeslee– 7:30 p.m.

Howling Wolf, 76 Lafayette Street, Salem

Fri., April 12 – Nick Consone – 10 p.m.
Sat., April 13 – Vein – 10 p.m.

Red Rock Bistro & Bar, 141 Humphrey Street, Swampscott

Fri., April 12 – Mary Beth Maes
Sat., April 13 – Shuffle Mode with Kevin Kenney

Stonewood Tavern, Newhall Plaza, 139 Lynnfield St., Suite 200, Peabody

Fri., April 12 – N/A
Sat., April 13 – Grupo Fantasia

Capone’s Restaurant & Bar, 147 Summit St, Peabody

Fri., April 12 – Brandy
Sat., April 13 – Gainsville Road

Chianti’s Tuscan Restaurant & Jazz Lounge, 285 Cabot St., Beverly

Fri., April 12 – 3 Vibe
Sat., April 13 – Boston Horns

The Landing Restaurant, 81 Front St., Marblehead

Fri., April 12 – 74 Duster Entertains
Sat., April 13 – Rene and Joe

Me and Thee Coffee House, 28 Mugford St., Marblehead

Fri., April 12 – Hot Club of Cowtown · Jon Shain opens – 8 p.m.
Sat., April 13 – N/A

July 6th, 2011

Then & Now: Tasty Memories

This former mansion has changed over the years, but now resembles the original more than what most of us remember. 
Does it look familiar? Look at the second vintage photo for its recent appearance.
Built around 1760 for the wealthy mercha…

July 5th, 2011

‘Out Night’ in Salem a Success

Congratulations to everyone who worked to make ‘Out Night’ a Success last week.
Coinciding with Gay Pride month, the event, which featured shopping specials and celebration in the downtown area focused on welcome gay, lesbian and transender visi…

July 2nd, 2011

Richard Flynn: ‘Running Down the Road of Life with Shoelaces Untied’

You might know him as “the Hammer” or maybe, more recently, “the Wrench.”
Perhaps you don’t know him by one of his monikers, but maybe you’ve seen his work or spotted him in a local coffee shop. You might recognize him as that guy you’ve seen wh…

June 27th, 2011

Then & Now: Spirits of Salem

Do you remember this store?
This postcard view shows one of the oldest buildings on Washington Streetthat has a long and varied history as both a store and residence.
Captain Abel Lawrence (1754-1822), a wealthy Salem merchant who owned a d…

June 27th, 2011

Full 4th of July Schedule

The following press release is courtesy of the City of Salem.
Salem Celebrates the 4th
Mayor Kimberley Driscoll is pleased to announce that there will be a full afternoon and evening of exciting entertainment and events at Salem’s 4th of Ju…

June 22nd, 2011

July 4 at the House of the Seven Gables

The following is courtesy of the House of the Seven Gables.
JULY 4TH CELEBRATION AT THE GABLES TO FEATURE READING OF THE NOVEL, PICNIC AND FIREWORKS
Join The House of the Seven Gables for its traditional Independence Day celebration and …

June 22nd, 2011

Enjoy the 4th of July in Salem

The 4th of July is almost here and Salem’s employees have been hard at work pulling together a grand celebration in commemoration of our nation’s birthday.
“It started 10 or 11 years ago, and it’s been this big for seven or eight years,” said…

June 20th, 2011

Then & Now: Model T Memories

The area where this building stands has a long history dating back to the beginnings of Salem.
In October of 1649, Robert Buffum, aka ‘Goodman’ Buffum was given a grant of 40 acres of upland and five acres of meadow and marsh as recorded in the …

June 19th, 2011

Marsha Therese Danzig — Reaching the World Through Yoga

Marsha Therese Danzig’s vision of yoga transcends her hometown of Wenham and even Salem where she currently practices at Green Tea Yoga.”Teaching yoga is one thing,” Danzig said. “Teaching kids is a whole other thing…I have a very global vision. I …

Next Page »